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Question: If a client doesn't want to complete a medical history, do you treat or not?

Asked by MarioD 3 years ago

21 answers

If a client contacts you for a treatment and you ask them to complete a medical history and they are unwilling to fully disclose, do you take the decision to treat or not? My gut feeling says No, but interested to see what the rest of you would do?

Treatments:
Reflexology

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Sarah-Pluves 3 years ago

I wouldn't treat. They need to tell you their medical history so you can treat appropriately. What if they hadn't disclosed they'd suffered from DVT which is a contraindication? Check your insurance too, as not having a medical history may invalidate it.

Answer Comments

MarioD 3 years ago

Hi Sarah, thanks for taking the time to share your thoughts. I think that you are absolutely right about the insurance and for me it also comes down to trust, how can you begin to treat someone if they don't trust you?

Radiance-Vitality 3 years ago

Hi

I absolutely would not treat using any therapy in this case for 2 reasons

Because your insurance becomes invalid (GB) once you accept them without completing a full consultation as you have been negligent in not getting all the facts.

Because full and complete consultations are for your safety as well as for theirs so all full & local contra-indications can be identified & you don't treat someone who then sues you as you harmed them

Don't know where you are from or what training you have had, but wouldn't you be suspect of someone with-holding information, especially as over here there have been insurance scams so without a complete consultation, your insurance company will bail potentially.

Also I get them to sign at the bottom that they have given me all of their medical history & not witheld anything& also they sign to say they still want me to treat them so they cant accuse me of assault (believe it or not) at a later date.

We have also been recommended to give after care advice ahead of treatment now to make sure they have ALL the facts beforehand so we cant be accused of misleading them or leaving anything out which would have meant they would have declined treatment.

Hope this helps

Other answers (20)

Easethepressure 3 years ago

I wouldn't treat either. You might be treating them when they have a contraindication and if nothing else, if they don't trust you how good a result are you likely to get. It's difficult but be strong and say sorry but no.

Answer Comments

MarioD 3 years ago

Thanks for taking the time to reply. I completely agree and have taken this stance, although it doesn't feel comfortable. But for me it is a question of trust, if the person you are treating has no trust in you, you've started off on the wrong foot (excuse the pun). And it is also a quetion of invalidating your insurance. And since Reflexology is a holistic therapy, you're not getting an overall picture of the person.

angelscorpio 3 years ago

no i wouldnt want to treat ..

JaneyB 3 years ago

Would not treat. What are they trying to hide? I sometimes let clients refuse to give me marital status but that is about it. How do you know what to treat or not to treat if you do nt have full medical details. Would also be concerned that if anything untoward happened,you would not be covered by insurance

Answer Comments

MarioD 3 years ago

Thank you to everyone who took the time to comment, all your opinions are greatly appreciated.

SophieCroxford 3 years ago

I definitely wouldnt treat a client without having a medical hsitory. It goes against everything I have learnt. Contraindications for starters but also I like to know about mental attitudes as well as physical conditions and going through someones history gives you an insight into them and encourages them to open up about themselves.

Iridologist 3 years ago

Dear Mario, It would really depend on the client. Is their attitude closed, belligerent? How they present, physically, emotionally and psychologically. Sometimes a client will want to know why I need t to know their religious beliefs and, as a Naturopath, this is important as their belief system determines their diets quite frequently etc etc. I am able to back up my reasons for wanting a medical history.

Sometimes clients may wish to gauge your 'worth as a practitioner' on whether you can supply a diagnosis without knowing their symptoms (which is a no no for any practitioner to diagnose) - and I can usually flush that one out! As Sarah said, what if they were to suffer from DVT, or a female on the first trimester of pregnancy. If the apparent lack of disclosure included not giving contact details then i definitely wouldn't treat.

lindadb 3 years ago

I possibly would but I would make a list of all contraindications and get them to sign a disclaimer to at least say that they don't have any....They may not want to reveal a long ago problem that they are embarrassed about....

TherapeuticTouch 3 years ago

Nope, I do not take or work on any client who refuses to fill out their medical history, it is too risky. There are numerous things that could happen while working, i.e. moving a thrombosis for example. I've even been bold as to tell clients, I had to contact their doctor before going any further while they were in my office; when I get a bleak answer or feel they do not know enough about a situation or may be with holding information. I've even had to have a doctors note once or twice too. It is always better to be safe than sorry.

On the flip side, I know therapists who do not have forms for clients...they think it is being too personal. My question for them is always "what if something happens to the client while on your table or after?" We therapists not only need forms to be fill out, but to sit with clients and review what they have put down to clarify any information before working on them so there is no miscommunication; and after a session take good notes too. It is for our protection yes, but most importantly the protection of our clients! Working with many doctors in my area, it is good to be able to present them with good information, session notes on my end [etc]. It helps when a client seeks for medical help and gives permission for me to discuss any thing I feel /think I need to with them. Sarah took the words out of my mouth, because I too would have mentioned the insurance.

Did this client get upset with you? If so, my advice is roll up your sleeves because it is going to happen again! I've had many male clients refuse to sign the sexual harassment section on my forms and I will not take anyone who may be a threat to me or my business. Over the past 19 yrs. I've only had a couple of new clients walk out because they refuse to fill out forms. It doesn't bother me. I see it as they did me a favor! Those who really need the therapy, they are the ones that stay and you don't have issues with.

Hope that helps you! Blessings,
Renee

healer98 3 years ago

Some times the will fill it out but very vaguely but it's been a long time since someone completely refused so here's the idea I came up with should I get someone who won't fill it out: have them fill in their name at the top then refused underneath where they'd fill in their address and so on in big printed letters then have them sign and date the form where they'd normally sign it and you sign it too making notation that the client refused to fill in the form and then you can work on them with you not being responsible. OR you can have a section on your form that the client can sign that says they refuse to fill out the form and that YOU aren't responsible for any adverse reactions the client may have.

mmm2hands 3 years ago

Without my going into a long diatribe, I would simply agree with most everyone and not treat for the client and my mutual best interest.

BeaHicks 3 years ago

Hi Mario, I would not treat a client without a full medical history, Why refuse to complete the questionaire?????????Hiding something ???? Have you tried asking the Questions maybe your client is not able to read or write English, (just a thought) And always trust your gut feeling it is near enough always right. Love & Light Bea

IsleofWightMassage 3 years ago

Hi, automatically NO. If it is reflexology and not body massage there may be a small 'but'. If you can create a disclaimer which your insurance company is happy with that basically covers all contraindications and get your client to sign and date it. That way you are not asking them to tell you what they have got but rather checking what they haven't got, then it is a slightly different situation. If they refuse to sign that then do not treat. Also tell them they are antisocial!! (maybe not).The choice is yours, trust your instincts. I would not treat. xx

Answer Comments

MarioD 3 years ago

That made me laugh! But joking aside, thanks for taking the time.

BodyWorkHolisticTherapies 3 years ago

I would definately not treat anyone who refuses to disclose their medical history...its sounds like they are certainly hiding something. As much as we love helping people there has to be a point where we choose to look after ourselves and consider the implications a decision may have on our own career. They should also appreciate we are only looking after their medical wellbeing.

BeautyBySophia 3 years ago

hi mario, i would definately NOT treat anyone who refuse to complate there medical history,why refuse ? it could be they are hiding something or they dont trust you ? my instint would say no.
sophia

reSource-therapy 3 years ago

I know my insurance requires a medical history. I also know people who, in spite of filling one out, didn't tell the whole truth. If someone balks it is so easy, after 11 years at this, to just say "No"

Galway-Relaxation 3 years ago

Hi, I would't treat anyone without a full medical history, for the reasons already given in the previous replies. Just explain to the person the reasons why you need the medical history and reassure them that the information won't be shared with anyone else. You are right to trust your gut instinct! Good Luck!

TheGo2Osteopath 3 years ago

The important thing to emphasize is that a relevant medical history is not only necessarily for safety and legal reasons, but it is also in the patient's best interest. Personally I wouldn't turn them away. If you explain that the information is required to take the consultation any further, it is entirely their choice whether they want to disclose the information and continue or if they want to end the consultation at that point.

Answer Comments

getlost 3 years ago

I gave my full medical history , within the next 24 hours I was bombarded with at least 300 emails from all sorts of insurance providers ! , that was not the lot though, my phone did not stop ringing about all sorts of offers , promotions and funeral arrangements ! I am only 41 ! Thanks God , I gave the wrong medical history when the practitioner insisted ! get real , your guys does not know what goes behind the scene. It is not you , it is the company's owners.

getlost 3 years ago

I gave my full medical history , within the next 24 hours I was bombarded with at least 300 emails from all sorts of insurance providers ! , that was not the lot though, my phone did not stop ringing about all sorts of offers , promotions and funeral arrangements ! I am only 41 ! Thanks God , I gave the wrong medical history when the practitioner insisted ! get real , your guys does not know what goes behind the scene. It is not you , it is the company's owners.

getlost 3 years ago

I gave my full medical history , within the next 24 hours I was bombarded with at least 300 emails from all sorts of insurance providers ! , that was not the lot though, my phone did not stop ringing about all sorts of offers , promotions and funeral arrangements ! I am only 41 ! Thanks God , I gave the wrong medical history when the practitioner insisted ! get real , your guys does not know what goes behind the scene. It is not you , it is the company's owners.

Charly1 3 years ago

if they are unwilling to disclose any medical info then yes do not treat. in my 5 year experience i have never had anyone refuse to give any medical info but at the same time i sit them down and let them fill out a questionnaire on the record card then the indemnity states ' i have read and understand the questions asked above. to the best of my knowledge the answer given are correct at date of signing. i have not witheld any information that may be relevent to my treatment. ' then ge tthem to sign and date. under the data protection act you are required to get keep all details confidential and UP TO DATE!

Tracy1980 3 years ago

My first thought is no, I would not treat someone who did not complete a medical history. However, if they really wanted a massage from me but did not want to fill out the form, maybe I would give them a LIGHT massage or a Reiki session, (without medical history I would never do deep tissue, trigger point etc.) and have them fill out a waiver saying they refused to give a medical history and that if anything happened it would be on them. Just a thought.
It's hard to say no to someone that really needs the help. I find that many people are embarrassed about there medical history and that is why they do not want to fill out forms.

Sources: http://www.tracyklein.weebly.com

WestLondonColonics 1 year ago

Hi, i am Julia Rhodes of West London Colonics .
Answering this question requires a little scene setting. Colonic Hydrotherapy as an art form is a treatment with client and therapist working in tandem. It is not a medical intervention, and does not pretend to be. It is however a health–related intervention. I think a good hydro therapy session usefully can mirror some of the best strategies from medical practice. For instance, the therapist takes the responsibility to explain what is happening, and tailoring the treatment around client needs, safety and comfort. Medics call information sharing ahead of the session full disclosure. It applies both to therapist and client . The colon hydrotherapist needs to talk not only about the plus points of colon hydro therapy, but also the occasional negatives. And the client also needs to adopt the attitude of disclosure – sharing issues that may have a bearing on the colonic treatment . When both are in place, that provides the bedrock for the next stage of the therapeutic relationship, informed consent.
Without full disclosure ( so the client knows whets what , and the therapist knows what they are dealing with ) there is not informed consent( on either side). I know I am applying the two terms slightly differently than does the medical profession, but it works for me.

WestLondonColonics 1 year ago

Hi, i am Julia Rhodes of West London Colonics .
Answering this question requires a little scene setting. Colonic Hydrotherapy as an art form is a treatment with client and therapist working in tandem. It is not a medical intervention, and does not pretend to be. It is however a health–related intervention. I think a good hydro therapy session usefully can mirror some of the best strategies from medical practice. For instance, the therapist takes the responsibility to explain what is happening, and tailoring the treatment around client needs, safety and comfort. Medics call information sharing ahead of the session full disclosure. It applies both to therapist and client . The colon hydrotherapist needs to talk not only about the plus points of colon hydro therapy, but also the occasional negatives. And the client also needs to adopt the attitude of disclosure – sharing issues that may have a bearing on the colonic treatment . When both are in place, that provides the bedrock for the next stage of the therapeutic relationship, informed consent.
Without full disclosure ( so the client knows whets what , and the therapist knows what they are dealing with ) there is not informed consent( on either side). I know I am applying the two terms slightly differently than does the medical profession, but it works for me.

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